Wireless frame synchronisation

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Frame sync’ing cameras together is one of the main benefits of using digital high speed cameras rather than analogue. The idea of frame locked cameras was unheard of in the days of cine cameras. Until very recently, frame sync’ing wirelessly has just been a pipe dream. Most digital high speed cameras have cables for sync’ing,…

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Frame Synchronisation

View News Story - Frame Synchronisation

High speed cameras are often synchonised, (aka genlocked, framelocked) together. All but the most basic cameras include the ability to input or output a sync signal for this purpose. Creating movies with frames captured at exactly the same instant has many uses, including: Accurate motion analysis of an event with cameras at multiple viewing positions…

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Understanding Memory Types

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The two critical components in all digital high speed cameras are sensors, which have to get rid of an image very quickly in order to capture the next, and memory, which has to accept data at a phenomenal rate. Several different memory types are used. RAM in the camera. The majority of high speed cameras…

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Understanding Resolution

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Image resolution is measured in pixels – or picture elements; the dots that together make up the image. This article focuses on video resolution, although many aspects of course apply to still images too. When digital displays first became commonly used, they tended to be VGA resolution (640×480 pixels). Over the last few years the…

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Producing 3D Movies

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Producing a 3D movie is not as complicated as you might think. There are a few different formats of 3D file that are played on various devices. Here, I’ll explain how to produce a side-by-side movie, which seems to be the most common for playing on a 3D TV. A side by side movie made…

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Sync’ing two (or more) cameras to each other

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There are many reasons why you’d want to synchronise two or more cameras together including. To analyse a test from different viewpoints, with an accurate timebase. To create 3D movies Multiple cameras share a pulsed light source (LED or laser) In either case, the camera configuration is the same. The cameras need to have ‘sync…

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